Problem using 'tar' to install software on Linux

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Problem using 'tar' to install software on Linux

Frank Geitzler
I am attempting to install the 'go' language onto a laptop with ubuntu
18.04.  The documentation at https://golang.org/d/ had me download
go.13.1.linux-amd64.tar.gz, and then suggests the command to install it
into /usr/local, which you can see in the attached terminal session.

Linux does not seem to accept the options -xzf, either as a single
option, or separated (see the attached snippet).  Can anyone suggest the
reason?

Thanks,

Frank


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Re: Problem using 'tar' to install software on Linux

Douglas Guptill
Hello Frank:

On Sat, Oct 12, 2019 at 11:02:58PM -0300, Frank Geitzler wrote:

> I am attempting to install the 'go' language onto a laptop with ubuntu
> 18.04.  The documentation at https://golang.org/d/ had me download
> go.13.1.linux-amd64.tar.gz, and then suggests the command to install it into
> /usr/local, which you can see in the attached terminal session.
>
> Linux does not seem to accept the options -xzf, either as a single option,
> or separated (see the attached snippet).  Can anyone suggest the reason?

I am not familiar with ubuntu.  On Debian and Slackware systems, this
has always worked for me:

gzip -dc xxx.tar.gz | tar -xf -

Hope that helps,
Douglas.
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Re: Problem using 'tar' to install software on Linux

Joel Maxuel
In reply to this post by Frank Geitzler
Hi Frank,

According to the command you tried:

~/Downloads$ sudo tar -c /usr/local -x -z -f go1.13.1.linux-
amd64.tar.gz

... it's worth noting that the -c switch is to create a tarball - since
later in the same command you are instructing tar to extract via the -x
switch, tar does not know which operation is intended.

Thus the error:
tar: You may not specify more than one '-Acdtrux' ...

Refers to the first section of the tar man page of uses:

tar {A|c|d|r|t|u|x}[GnSkUWOmpsMBiajJzZhPlRvwo] [ARG...]

Anyway, since you are attempting to extract contents of a tarball to a
different destination directory, it is easier to be in that destination
at the outset.  For example:

~/Downloads$ cd /usr/local
/usr/local$ sudo tar xzf /home/frank/Downloads/go1.13.1.linux-
amd64.tar.gz

... or copy from Downloads post-extract:

~/Downloads$ tar xzf /home/frank/Downloads/go1.13.1.linux-amd64.tar.gz
~/Downloads$ sudo cp -a go1.13.1.linux-amd64 /usr/local/

With the former, you will need to reference your homespace with the
absolute reference instead of the tilde, since sudo would assume a
tilde would refer to root's home space.  With the latter, pay attention
to the use of forward-slashes.

You may be able to use --one-top-level[=DIR] for this as well, but I
believe that extracts contents without directory structure.

Hope this helps.

--
Regards,
Joel Maxuel

On Sat, 2019-10-12 at 23:02 -0300, Frank Geitzler wrote:

> I am attempting to install the 'go' language onto a laptop with
> ubuntu 
> 18.04.  The documentation at https://golang.org/d/ had me download 
> go.13.1.linux-amd64.tar.gz, and then suggests the command to install
> it 
> into /usr/local, which you can see in the attached terminal session.
>
> Linux does not seem to accept the options -xzf, either as a single 
> option, or separated (see the attached snippet).  Can anyone suggest
> the 
> reason?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Frank
>
> _______________________________________________
> nSLUG mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://nslug.ns.ca/mailman/listinfo/nslug
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Re: Problem using 'tar' to install software on Linux

herb Theriault-2
In reply to this post by Frank Geitzler

In my experience, you have to lead with the z flag. So if you want to uncompress in a particular directory, and you're doing it by hand:

(as root)

cd /usr/local/

tar -zxvf /path/to/golang.tar.gz

That should uncompress in the directory you are in.


On 2019-10-12 11:02 p.m., Frank Geitzler wrote:
I am attempting to install the 'go' language onto a laptop with ubuntu 18.04.  The documentation at https://golang.org/d/ had me download go.13.1.linux-amd64.tar.gz, and then suggests the command to install it into /usr/local, which you can see in the attached terminal session.

Linux does not seem to accept the options -xzf, either as a single option, or separated (see the attached snippet).  Can anyone suggest the reason?

Thanks,

Frank


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Re: Problem using 'tar' to install software on Linux

billdavidson
In reply to this post by Joel Maxuel
What Joel said, with one more point.  The "-c" option means "create", but the "-C /path/to/dir" means "change to /path/to/dir before extracting", so I assume that is what the go installtion instructions said.

On Oct 12, 2019 11:46 PM, Joel Maxuel <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hi Frank,

According to the command you tried:

~/Downloads$ sudo tar -c /usr/local -x -z -f go1.13.1.linux-
amd64.tar.gz

... it's worth noting that the -c switch is to create a tarball - since
later in the same command you are instructing tar to extract via the -x
switch, tar does not know which operation is intended.

Thus the error:
tar: You may not specify more than one '-Acdtrux' ...

Refers to the first section of the tar man page of uses:

tar {A|c|d|r|t|u|x}[GnSkUWOmpsMBiajJzZhPlRvwo] [ARG...]

Anyway, since you are attempting to extract contents of a tarball to a
different destination directory, it is easier to be in that destination
at the outset.  For example:

~/Downloads$ cd /usr/local
/usr/local$ sudo tar xzf /home/frank/Downloads/go1.13.1.linux-
amd64.tar.gz

... or copy from Downloads post-extract:

~/Downloads$ tar xzf /home/frank/Downloads/go1.13.1.linux-amd64.tar.gz
~/Downloads$ sudo cp -a go1.13.1.linux-amd64 /usr/local/

With the former, you will need to reference your homespace with the
absolute reference instead of the tilde, since sudo would assume a
tilde would refer to root's home space.  With the latter, pay attention
to the use of forward-slashes.

You may be able to use --one-top-level[=DIR] for this as well, but I
believe that extracts contents without directory structure.

Hope this helps.

--
Regards,
Joel Maxuel

On Sat, 2019-10-12 at 23:02 -0300, Frank Geitzler wrote:
> I am attempting to install the 'go' language onto a laptop with
> ubuntu 
> 18.04.  The documentation at https://golang.org/d/ had me download 
> go.13.1.linux-amd64.tar.gz, and then suggests the command to install
> it 
> into /usr/local, which you can see in the attached terminal session.
>
> Linux does not seem to accept the options -xzf, either as a single 
> option, or separated (see the attached snippet).  Can anyone suggest
> the 
> reason?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Frank
>
> _______________________________________________
> nSLUG mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://nslug.ns.ca/mailman/listinfo/nslug
_______________________________________________
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[hidden email]
http://nslug.ns.ca/mailman/listinfo/nslug



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Re: Problem using 'tar' to install software on Linux

Oliver Doepner

Frank, why not save yourself the trouble with tar and simply install the Ubuntu distribution packages:
$ sudo apt-get update
$ sudo apt-get install golang-go




On Sun, Oct 13, 2019 at 10:01 AM <[hidden email]> wrote:
What Joel said, with one more point.  The "-c" option means "create", but the "-C /path/to/dir" means "change to /path/to/dir before extracting", so I assume that is what the go installtion instructions said.

On Oct 12, 2019 11:46 PM, Joel Maxuel <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hi Frank,

According to the command you tried:

~/Downloads$ sudo tar -c /usr/local -x -z -f go1.13.1.linux-
amd64.tar.gz

... it's worth noting that the -c switch is to create a tarball - since
later in the same command you are instructing tar to extract via the -x
switch, tar does not know which operation is intended.

Thus the error:
tar: You may not specify more than one '-Acdtrux' ...

Refers to the first section of the tar man page of uses:

tar {A|c|d|r|t|u|x}[GnSkUWOmpsMBiajJzZhPlRvwo] [ARG...]

Anyway, since you are attempting to extract contents of a tarball to a
different destination directory, it is easier to be in that destination
at the outset.  For example:

~/Downloads$ cd /usr/local
/usr/local$ sudo tar xzf /home/frank/Downloads/go1.13.1.linux-
amd64.tar.gz

... or copy from Downloads post-extract:

~/Downloads$ tar xzf /home/frank/Downloads/go1.13.1.linux-amd64.tar.gz
~/Downloads$ sudo cp -a go1.13.1.linux-amd64 /usr/local/

With the former, you will need to reference your homespace with the
absolute reference instead of the tilde, since sudo would assume a
tilde would refer to root's home space.  With the latter, pay attention
to the use of forward-slashes.

You may be able to use --one-top-level[=DIR] for this as well, but I
believe that extracts contents without directory structure.

Hope this helps.

--
Regards,
Joel Maxuel

On Sat, 2019-10-12 at 23:02 -0300, Frank Geitzler wrote:
> I am attempting to install the 'go' language onto a laptop with
> ubuntu 
> 18.04.  The documentation at https://golang.org/d/ had me download 
> go.13.1.linux-amd64.tar.gz, and then suggests the command to install
> it 
> into /usr/local, which you can see in the attached terminal session.
>
> Linux does not seem to accept the options -xzf, either as a single 
> option, or separated (see the attached snippet).  Can anyone suggest
> the 
> reason?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Frank
>
> _______________________________________________
> nSLUG mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://nslug.ns.ca/mailman/listinfo/nslug
_______________________________________________
nSLUG mailing list
[hidden email]
http://nslug.ns.ca/mailman/listinfo/nslug


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Re: Problem using 'tar' to install software on Linux

George N. White III
In reply to this post by billdavidson
On Sun, 13 Oct 2019 at 10:01, <[hidden email]> wrote:
What Joel said, with one more point.  The "-c" option means "create", but the "-C /path/to/dir" means "change to /path/to/dir before extracting", so I assume that is what the go installtion instructions said.

I just checked the instructions, https://golang.org/doc/install, and they do use "-C" (capital C)
 
[...]

--
George N. White III


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Thanks Re: Problem using 'tar' to install software on Linux

Frank Geitzler

Thanks to Douglas Guptill, Joel Maxuel, Herb, Bill Davidson, Oliver Doepner, George N. White, and my apologies to anyone else I have overlooked here.  Thank you for taking the time to look into my problem, and for your helpful suggestions.  I found most of  my mistakes, incorporated a number of your suggestions into my command string (and procedures) and seem to have successfully executed the 'tar' command -at any rate, there was NO warning, error, or progress message when the command was entered, and the 'go' folder was created in /usr/local, as I checked with graphic rather than terminal commands.  However, when I attempted to determine the version installed, I found that go had not been properly installed as I thought.

I had cataract eye surgery last week, which took my attention away from this for quite a few days

I read the instructions, https://golang.org/doc/install, , further, and found that I had to update the PATH variable.

I am reminded of a large button which many mainframe programmers  wore to a number of conferences I attended many years ago; the button showed simply the four large letters 'RTFM'.  When asked, the programmers replied simply "Read The ... Manual".  I took a closer look at the MAN pages for the 'tar' command, and, yes, at the go installation instructions. 

I have been able to get 'go' to execute sample programs, but I made the mistake of creating a '/usr/local/go' folder, and using 'tar' to unpack the module there -which I think created an incorrect directory structure.  My /usr/local now contains 10 folders: bin, etc, games, go, include, lib, an, sbin, share, and src.  Below the 'go' folder, however, are 8 folders and 10 files.  There are  folders api, bin, doc, lib, misc, pkg, src, and test, and files AUTHORS, CONTRIBUTING.md, CONTRIBUTORS, favicon.ico, LICENSE, PATENTS, README.md, robots.txt, SECURITY.md, and VERSION.

If the directory structure is incorrect, I am not sure what I should do to correct it.  In order to execute a 'go' program, I need to enter the command in the following way: /usr/local/go/bin/go run mysourceprogram.go.

Does anyone have any suggestions?  I am not sure that I will be able to make it to the HCC meeting this evening -my eyes are not up for night driving yet.

Frank


On 2019-10-13 5:42 p.m., George N. White III wrote:
On Sun, 13 Oct 2019 at 10:01, <[hidden email]> wrote:
What Joel said, with one more point.  The "-c" option means "create", but the "-C /path/to/dir" means "change to /path/to/dir before extracting", so I assume that is what the go installtion instructions said.

I just checked the instructions, https://golang.org/doc/install, and they do use "-C" (capital C)
 
[...]

--
George N. White III


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[hidden email]
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Re: Thanks Re: Problem using 'tar' to install software on Linux

Joel Maxwell
Hi Frank,

I presume the surgery went well then - if so, good to hear.

There are a few options for this:

- symlink the `go` binary to your personal ~/bin/go (if you have one)
- symlink the `go` binary to /usr/local/bin/go
- add the /usr/local/go/bin to your PATH environment variable
- use the `golang-go` Ubuntu package (as Oliver previously suggested)

If the version of `go` downloaded is meant to be newer than the one in
the Ubuntu archives, I'd go with adjusting the PATH variable [*].  This
is done by editing your hidden ~/.profile. You may see in there
already:

# set PATH so it includes user's private bin if it exists
if [ -d "$HOME/bin" ] ; then
    PATH="$HOME/bin:$PATH"
fi

... feel free to add: 

PATH="/usr/local/go/bin:$PATH"

... before or after that if [...] fi block.  Save, then fire up an
additional terminal (or log back in) to test.  Note that this gives all
binaries in /usr/local/go/bin preference over any others of the same
name.  I chose the front-load option in case you do have a different
version of `go` already installed (since front-loading the additional
path will choose your new version anytime).  Back-loading would look
like:

PATH="$PATH:/usr/local/go/bin"

... since in this case we are getting the old PATH first, and adding
(colon is the separator) one more).

FWIW you can look at what is stored there anytime by:

$ echo $PATH
/usr/local/bin:/usr/bin:/bin:/usr/local/games:/usr/games

[*] If not, then as Oliver mentioned (this will help for future
updates):
$ sudo apt-get update
$ sudo apt-get install golang-go


--
Regards,
Joel Maxuel

On Tue, 2019-10-22 at 12:46 -0300, Frank Geitzler wrote:

> Thanks to Douglas Guptill, Joel Maxuel, Herb, Bill Davidson, Oliver
> Doepner, George N. White, and my apologies to anyone else I have
> overlooked here.  Thank you for taking the time to look into my
> problem, and for your helpful suggestions.  I found most of  my
> mistakes, incorporated a number of your suggestions into my command
> string (and procedures) and seem to have successfully executed the
> 'tar' command -at any rate, there was NO warning, error, or progress
> message when the command was entered, and the 'go' folder was created
> in /usr/local, as I checked with graphic rather than terminal
> commands.  However, when I attempted to determine the version
> installed, I found that go had not been properly installed as I
> thought.
> I had cataract eye surgery last week, which took my attention away
> from this for quite a few days
> I read the instructions, https://golang.org/doc/install, , further,
> and found that I had to update the PATH variable.
> I am reminded of a large button which many mainframe programmers 
> wore to a number of conferences I attended many years ago; the button
> showed simply the four large letters 'RTFM'.  When asked, the
> programmers replied simply "Read The ... Manual".  I took a closer
> look at the MAN pages for the 'tar' command, and, yes, at the go
> installation instructions.  
> I have been able to get 'go' to execute sample programs, but I made
> the mistake of creating a '/usr/local/go' folder, and using 'tar' to
> unpack the module there -which I think created an incorrect directory
> structure.  My /usr/local now contains 10 folders: bin, etc, games,
> go, include, lib, an, sbin, share, and src.  Below the 'go' folder,
> however, are 8 folders and 10 files.  There are  folders api, bin,
> doc, lib, misc, pkg, src, and test, and files AUTHORS,
> CONTRIBUTING.md, CONTRIBUTORS, favicon.ico, LICENSE, PATENTS,
> README.md, robots.txt, SECURITY.md, and VERSION.
> If the directory structure is incorrect, I am not sure what I should
> do to correct it.  In order to execute a 'go' program, I need to
> enter the command in the following way: /usr/local/go/bin/go run
> mysourceprogram.go.
> Does anyone have any suggestions?  I am not sure that I will be able
> to make it to the HCC meeting this evening -my eyes are not up for
> night driving yet.
> Frank
>
> On 2019-10-13 5:42 p.m., George N. White III wrote:
> > On Sun, 13 Oct 2019 at 10:01, <[hidden email]> wrote:
> > > What Joel said, with one more point.  The "-c" option means
> > > "create", but the "-C /path/to/dir" means "change to /path/to/dir
> > > before extracting", so I assume that is what the go installtion
> > > instructions said.
> > >
> >
> > I just checked the instructions, https://golang.org/doc/install,
> > and they do use "-C" (capital C)
> >  
> > > [...]
> > >
> >
> > -- 
> > George N. White III
> >
> >
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > nSLUG mailing list
> > [hidden email]
> > http://nslug.ns.ca/mailman/listinfo/nslug
>
> _______________________________________________
> nSLUG mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://nslug.ns.ca/mailman/listinfo/nslug
_______________________________________________
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Re: Thanks Re: Problem using 'tar' to install software on Linux

Oliver Doepner
Everybody,

FRANKly speaking, can you please stop assisting people in shooting
themselves in the proverbial foot with unnecessary complexity?

FRANK: As I already mentioned (this will also help significantly with
future updates), just do this:

$ sudo apt-get update
$ sudo apt-get install golang-go

And Bob will be your uncle.  :)

Thanks
Oliver

On 10/22/19, Joel Maxwell <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hi Frank,
>
> I presume the surgery went well then - if so, good to hear.
>
> There are a few options for this:
>
> - symlink the `go` binary to your personal ~/bin/go (if you have one)
> - symlink the `go` binary to /usr/local/bin/go
> - add the /usr/local/go/bin to your PATH environment variable
> - use the `golang-go` Ubuntu package (as Oliver previously suggested)
>
> If the version of `go` downloaded is meant to be newer than the one in
> the Ubuntu archives, I'd go with adjusting the PATH variable [*].  This
> is done by editing your hidden ~/.profile. You may see in there
> already:
>
> # set PATH so it includes user's private bin if it exists
> if [ -d "$HOME/bin" ] ; then
>     PATH="$HOME/bin:$PATH"
> fi
>
> ... feel free to add:
>
> PATH="/usr/local/go/bin:$PATH"
>
> ... before or after that if [...] fi block.  Save, then fire up an
> additional terminal (or log back in) to test.  Note that this gives all
> binaries in /usr/local/go/bin preference over any others of the same
> name.  I chose the front-load option in case you do have a different
> version of `go` already installed (since front-loading the additional
> path will choose your new version anytime).  Back-loading would look
> like:
>
> PATH="$PATH:/usr/local/go/bin"
>
> ... since in this case we are getting the old PATH first, and adding
> (colon is the separator) one more).
>
> FWIW you can look at what is stored there anytime by:
>
> $ echo $PATH
> /usr/local/bin:/usr/bin:/bin:/usr/local/games:/usr/games
>
> [*] If not, then as Oliver mentioned (this will help for future
> updates):
> $ sudo apt-get update
> $ sudo apt-get install golang-go
>
>
> --
> Regards,
> Joel Maxuel
>
> On Tue, 2019-10-22 at 12:46 -0300, Frank Geitzler wrote:
>> Thanks to Douglas Guptill, Joel Maxuel, Herb, Bill Davidson, Oliver
>> Doepner, George N. White, and my apologies to anyone else I have
>> overlooked here.  Thank you for taking the time to look into my
>> problem, and for your helpful suggestions.  I found most of  my
>> mistakes, incorporated a number of your suggestions into my command
>> string (and procedures) and seem to have successfully executed the
>> 'tar' command -at any rate, there was NO warning, error, or progress
>> message when the command was entered, and the 'go' folder was created
>> in /usr/local, as I checked with graphic rather than terminal
>> commands.  However, when I attempted to determine the version
>> installed, I found that go had not been properly installed as I
>> thought.
>> I had cataract eye surgery last week, which took my attention away
>> from this for quite a few days
>> I read the instructions, https://golang.org/doc/install, , further,
>> and found that I had to update the PATH variable.
>> I am reminded of a large button which many mainframe programmers
>> wore to a number of conferences I attended many years ago; the button
>> showed simply the four large letters 'RTFM'.  When asked, the
>> programmers replied simply "Read The ... Manual".  I took a closer
>> look at the MAN pages for the 'tar' command, and, yes, at the go
>> installation instructions.
>> I have been able to get 'go' to execute sample programs, but I made
>> the mistake of creating a '/usr/local/go' folder, and using 'tar' to
>> unpack the module there -which I think created an incorrect directory
>> structure.  My /usr/local now contains 10 folders: bin, etc, games,
>> go, include, lib, an, sbin, share, and src.  Below the 'go' folder,
>> however, are 8 folders and 10 files.  There are  folders api, bin,
>> doc, lib, misc, pkg, src, and test, and files AUTHORS,
>> CONTRIBUTING.md, CONTRIBUTORS, favicon.ico, LICENSE, PATENTS,
>> README.md, robots.txt, SECURITY.md, and VERSION.
>> If the directory structure is incorrect, I am not sure what I should
>> do to correct it.  In order to execute a 'go' program, I need to
>> enter the command in the following way: /usr/local/go/bin/go run
>> mysourceprogram.go.
>> Does anyone have any suggestions?  I am not sure that I will be able
>> to make it to the HCC meeting this evening -my eyes are not up for
>> night driving yet.
>> Frank
>>
>> On 2019-10-13 5:42 p.m., George N. White III wrote:
>> > On Sun, 13 Oct 2019 at 10:01, <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> > > What Joel said, with one more point.  The "-c" option means
>> > > "create", but the "-C /path/to/dir" means "change to /path/to/dir
>> > > before extracting", so I assume that is what the go installtion
>> > > instructions said.
>> > >
>> >
>> > I just checked the instructions, https://golang.org/doc/install,
>> > and they do use "-C" (capital C)
>> >
>> > > [...]
>> > >
>> >
>> > --
>> > George N. White III
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> > _______________________________________________
>> > nSLUG mailing list
>> > [hidden email]
>> > http://nslug.ns.ca/mailman/listinfo/nslug
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> nSLUG mailing list
>> [hidden email]
>> http://nslug.ns.ca/mailman/listinfo/nslug
> _______________________________________________
> nSLUG mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://nslug.ns.ca/mailman/listinfo/nslug
>


--
--
Oliver Doepner
http://odoepner.github.io/
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Challenging vs validating edge-cases (was Re: Problem using 'tar' to install software on Linux)

Joel Maxwell
Thanks Oliver for the clarity.  I had provided options based on Frank's
issue at where he was stuck.  Yet five minutes of research (in effect
less time than to type out all the options), I would confirm that
unless Frank was using golang on Ubuntu 12.04 or older, I would have no
reason to suggest workarounds for a strategy that will cause more
issues later on.

My memory is that Frank does use outdated/unsupported Ubuntu on a
laptop, which validated providing a workaround to an edge case where in
reality, I should have challenged instead.

There are sometimes reasons to step outside the "normal" way of doing
things, though perhaps before I suggest... 
    "You did X and got problem Y - you can do A, B or C"
...to first, ask...
    "You did X and got problem Y - is there a specific reason not to
have done Z instead of X to begin with?"

The free software community has that "crisis of choice", however I do
fall victim to not questioning someone's intent when they run into a
problem because they did something outside the norm - was it with
purpose or did it come up out of ignorance?

It's a conundrum that appears elsewhere in my life since people tend to
not know what they want.  Hopefully I can learn to ask better questions
to be able to do a better job in answering their own.

--
Regards,
Joel Maxuel

On Tue, 2019-10-22 at 17:23 -0300, Oliver Doepner wrote:

> Everybody,
>
> FRANKly speaking, can you please stop assisting people in shooting
> themselves in the proverbial foot with unnecessary complexity?
>
> FRANK: As I already mentioned (this will also help significantly with
> future updates), just do this:
>
> $ sudo apt-get update
> $ sudo apt-get install golang-go
>
> And Bob will be your uncle.  :)
>
> Thanks
> Oliver
>
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Re: Challenging vs validating edge-cases (was Re: Problem using 'tar' to install software on Linux)

Oliver Doepner
Hi all,

I hope I didn't hurt anyone's feelings.

I just felt like everyone, including Frank had missed the detail, that
manual tarball installation wasn't necessary.

That's why I used CAPS as a frankness marker.

Have a great week
Oliver

On 10/26/19, Joel Maxwell <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Thanks Oliver for the clarity.  I had provided options based on Frank's
> issue at where he was stuck.  Yet five minutes of research (in effect
> less time than to type out all the options), I would confirm that
> unless Frank was using golang on Ubuntu 12.04 or older, I would have no
> reason to suggest workarounds for a strategy that will cause more
> issues later on.
>
> My memory is that Frank does use outdated/unsupported Ubuntu on a
> laptop, which validated providing a workaround to an edge case where in
> reality, I should have challenged instead.
>
> There are sometimes reasons to step outside the "normal" way of doing
> things, though perhaps before I suggest...
>     "You did X and got problem Y - you can do A, B or C"
> ...to first, ask...
>     "You did X and got problem Y - is there a specific reason not to
> have done Z instead of X to begin with?"
>
> The free software community has that "crisis of choice", however I do
> fall victim to not questioning someone's intent when they run into a
> problem because they did something outside the norm - was it with
> purpose or did it come up out of ignorance?
>
> It's a conundrum that appears elsewhere in my life since people tend to
> not know what they want.  Hopefully I can learn to ask better questions
> to be able to do a better job in answering their own.
>
> --
> Regards,
> Joel Maxuel
>
> On Tue, 2019-10-22 at 17:23 -0300, Oliver Doepner wrote:
>> Everybody,
>>
>> FRANKly speaking, can you please stop assisting people in shooting
>> themselves in the proverbial foot with unnecessary complexity?
>>
>> FRANK: As I already mentioned (this will also help significantly with
>> future updates), just do this:
>>
>> $ sudo apt-get update
>> $ sudo apt-get install golang-go
>>
>> And Bob will be your uncle.  :)
>>
>> Thanks
>> Oliver
>>
> _______________________________________________
> nSLUG mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://nslug.ns.ca/mailman/listinfo/nslug
>


--
--
Oliver Doepner
http://odoepner.github.io/
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Re: Challenging vs validating edge-cases (was Re: Problem using 'tar' to install software on Linux)

Frank Geitzler
Thanks, Oliver.  Actually, I had installed 'go' on my desktop Lenovo
running Ubuntu 18.04 last month, using Synaptic.  I found that the
release of 'go' I had installed was less current than was available with
the .tar, so I decided to install that version... and ran into
problems.  The problems seem to be resolved now, though, and I learned a
lot in the process -which was my objective in the first place.  I have
to learn how to read the 'go' error messages properly, though.

Thanks, everyone, for your help.

Frank

On 2019-10-27 9:45 p.m., Oliver Doepner wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> I hope I didn't hurt anyone's feelings.
>
> I just felt like everyone, including Frank had missed the detail, that
> manual tarball installation wasn't necessary.
>
> That's why I used CAPS as a frankness marker.
>
> Have a great week
> Oliver
>
> On 10/26/19, Joel Maxwell <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> Thanks Oliver for the clarity.  I had provided options based on Frank's
>> issue at where he was stuck.  Yet five minutes of research (in effect
>> less time than to type out all the options), I would confirm that
>> unless Frank was using golang on Ubuntu 12.04 or older, I would have no
>> reason to suggest workarounds for a strategy that will cause more
>> issues later on.
>>
>> My memory is that Frank does use outdated/unsupported Ubuntu on a
>> laptop, which validated providing a workaround to an edge case where in
>> reality, I should have challenged instead.
>>
>> There are sometimes reasons to step outside the "normal" way of doing
>> things, though perhaps before I suggest...
>>      "You did X and got problem Y - you can do A, B or C"
>> ...to first, ask...
>>      "You did X and got problem Y - is there a specific reason not to
>> have done Z instead of X to begin with?"
>>
>> The free software community has that "crisis of choice", however I do
>> fall victim to not questioning someone's intent when they run into a
>> problem because they did something outside the norm - was it with
>> purpose or did it come up out of ignorance?
>>
>> It's a conundrum that appears elsewhere in my life since people tend to
>> not know what they want.  Hopefully I can learn to ask better questions
>> to be able to do a better job in answering their own.
>>
>> --
>> Regards,
>> Joel Maxuel
>>
>> On Tue, 2019-10-22 at 17:23 -0300, Oliver Doepner wrote:
>>> Everybody,
>>>
>>> FRANKly speaking, can you please stop assisting people in shooting
>>> themselves in the proverbial foot with unnecessary complexity?
>>>
>>> FRANK: As I already mentioned (this will also help significantly with
>>> future updates), just do this:
>>>
>>> $ sudo apt-get update
>>> $ sudo apt-get install golang-go
>>>
>>> And Bob will be your uncle.  :)
>>>
>>> Thanks
>>> Oliver
>>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> nSLUG mailing list
>> [hidden email]
>> http://nslug.ns.ca/mailman/listinfo/nslug
>>
>
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Re: Challenging vs validating edge-cases (was Re: Problem using 'tar' to install software on Linux)

Oliver Doepner
Frank: May ask why you needed a newer Go version then what comes with Ubuntu?


On 10/27/19, Frank Geitzler <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Thanks, Oliver.  Actually, I had installed 'go' on my desktop Lenovo
> running Ubuntu 18.04 last month, using Synaptic.  I found that the
> release of 'go' I had installed was less current than was available with
> the .tar, so I decided to install that version... and ran into
> problems.  The problems seem to be resolved now, though, and I learned a
> lot in the process -which was my objective in the first place.  I have
> to learn how to read the 'go' error messages properly, though.
>
> Thanks, everyone, for your help.
>
> Frank
>
> On 2019-10-27 9:45 p.m., Oliver Doepner wrote:
>> Hi all,
>>
>> I hope I didn't hurt anyone's feelings.
>>
>> I just felt like everyone, including Frank had missed the detail, that
>> manual tarball installation wasn't necessary.
>>
>> That's why I used CAPS as a frankness marker.
>>
>> Have a great week
>> Oliver
>>
>> On 10/26/19, Joel Maxwell <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>> Thanks Oliver for the clarity.  I had provided options based on Frank's
>>> issue at where he was stuck.  Yet five minutes of research (in effect
>>> less time than to type out all the options), I would confirm that
>>> unless Frank was using golang on Ubuntu 12.04 or older, I would have no
>>> reason to suggest workarounds for a strategy that will cause more
>>> issues later on.
>>>
>>> My memory is that Frank does use outdated/unsupported Ubuntu on a
>>> laptop, which validated providing a workaround to an edge case where in
>>> reality, I should have challenged instead.
>>>
>>> There are sometimes reasons to step outside the "normal" way of doing
>>> things, though perhaps before I suggest...
>>>      "You did X and got problem Y - you can do A, B or C"
>>> ...to first, ask...
>>>      "You did X and got problem Y - is there a specific reason not to
>>> have done Z instead of X to begin with?"
>>>
>>> The free software community has that "crisis of choice", however I do
>>> fall victim to not questioning someone's intent when they run into a
>>> problem because they did something outside the norm - was it with
>>> purpose or did it come up out of ignorance?
>>>
>>> It's a conundrum that appears elsewhere in my life since people tend to
>>> not know what they want.  Hopefully I can learn to ask better questions
>>> to be able to do a better job in answering their own.
>>>
>>> --
>>> Regards,
>>> Joel Maxuel
>>>
>>> On Tue, 2019-10-22 at 17:23 -0300, Oliver Doepner wrote:
>>>> Everybody,
>>>>
>>>> FRANKly speaking, can you please stop assisting people in shooting
>>>> themselves in the proverbial foot with unnecessary complexity?
>>>>
>>>> FRANK: As I already mentioned (this will also help significantly with
>>>> future updates), just do this:
>>>>
>>>> $ sudo apt-get update
>>>> $ sudo apt-get install golang-go
>>>>
>>>> And Bob will be your uncle.  :)
>>>>
>>>> Thanks
>>>> Oliver
>>>>
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> nSLUG mailing list
>>> [hidden email]
>>> http://nslug.ns.ca/mailman/listinfo/nslug
>>>
>>
>


--
--
Oliver Doepner
http://odoepner.github.io/
_______________________________________________
nSLUG mailing list
[hidden email]
http://nslug.ns.ca/mailman/listinfo/nslug