Error message on restart, changing from a IDE to a SATA hard drive

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Error message on restart, changing from a IDE to a SATA hard drive

Frank Geitzler
I have an old Proteva 32-bit system a friend gave me, which I use to
test old hardware.   It came with Win-XP Home on a WD1200JB IDE hard
drive, and I removed that drive and put it away some time ago.  I made a
number of changes to the BIOS attempting to get the system to recognize
an old SATA drive, and was interrupted and didn't get back to it for
quite a while.  When I did attempt to use it, the onboard battery was
dead, and when I installed a new one, I couldn't get the system to work
at all.  I had forgotten which BIOS values I had changed, so eventually
I selected the 'factory reset to original values' option.  I then put
the original hard drive back in, deciding I would return to the original
working computer.  I was able to boot into Win-XP, but apparently
Windows no longer realized that it had been returned to its original
computer, and wanted to be validated before running. I had the original
product key, and entered it, but the system then wanted to be connected
to the internet.  I did so, but the Microsoft validation system told me
I would have to call support. I have not had much satisfaction calling
Microsoft support in the past, so have not yet done so.

I decided to install Ubuntu (alongside the Windows), and was successful,
but when I attempt to do a restart (either from Ubuntu, or from Win-XP),
the system comes to a halt, and I always receive the following error
message:

             Out of timing

            V : 53 Hz        H : 56.8 kHz

Does this error mean anything to anyone at either club?

If I find out what the error message means (or perhaps even if I don't),
my next project will be to determine how I should change the BIOS
settings so that I can use a SATA drive.

Any suggestions for either problem would be appreciated.

Merry Christmas!

Frank Geitzler

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Re: Error message on restart, changing from a IDE to a SATA hard drive

D G Teed-2
Vertical and Horizontal numbers would mean something related to the monitor.

If it was only from running Xorg on Linux, I'd say look at getting an xorg.conf
tuned for your monitor and video card.  If it happens with either OS, the hardware
has to be the culprit and the monitor is displaying a diagnostic.  That can include
a video card/chip that isn't within spec and is sending junk signals to the monitor.

If only happening on Linux, setting up an xorg.conf file is rarely needed these days, but
it can be required.  Googling the brand and model of monitor can find others
who have figured out the parameters for xorg.conf already or one can try
running one of the configuration commands to generate an xorg.conf file to start with.



On Tue, Dec 18, 2018 at 3:55 PM Frank Geitzler <[hidden email]> wrote:
I have an old Proteva 32-bit system a friend gave me, which I use to
test old hardware.   It came with Win-XP Home on a WD1200JB IDE hard
drive, and I removed that drive and put it away some time ago.  I made a
number of changes to the BIOS attempting to get the system to recognize
an old SATA drive, and was interrupted and didn't get back to it for
quite a while.  When I did attempt to use it, the onboard battery was
dead, and when I installed a new one, I couldn't get the system to work
at all.  I had forgotten which BIOS values I had changed, so eventually
I selected the 'factory reset to original values' option.  I then put
the original hard drive back in, deciding I would return to the original
working computer.  I was able to boot into Win-XP, but apparently
Windows no longer realized that it had been returned to its original
computer, and wanted to be validated before running. I had the original
product key, and entered it, but the system then wanted to be connected
to the internet.  I did so, but the Microsoft validation system told me
I would have to call support. I have not had much satisfaction calling
Microsoft support in the past, so have not yet done so.

I decided to install Ubuntu (alongside the Windows), and was successful,
but when I attempt to do a restart (either from Ubuntu, or from Win-XP),
the system comes to a halt, and I always receive the following error
message:

             Out of timing

            V : 53 Hz        H : 56.8 kHz

Does this error mean anything to anyone at either club?

If I find out what the error message means (or perhaps even if I don't),
my next project will be to determine how I should change the BIOS
settings so that I can use a SATA drive.

Any suggestions for either problem would be appreciated.

Merry Christmas!

Frank Geitzler

_______________________________________________
nSLUG mailing list
[hidden email]
http://nslug.ns.ca/mailman/listinfo/nslug

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Re: Error message on restart, changing from a IDE to a SATA hard drive

George N. White III
On Tue, 18 Dec 2018 at 16:26, D G Teed <[hidden email]> wrote:
Vertical and Horizontal numbers would mean something related to the monitor.

Yes, these realate to mode setting: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mode_setting
 

If it was only from running Xorg on Linux, I'd say look at getting an xorg.conf
tuned for your monitor and video card.  If it happens with either OS, the hardware
has to be the culprit and the monitor is displaying a diagnostic.  That can include
a video card/chip that isn't within spec and is sending junk signals to the monitor.

Or a bad cable.  Can you swap in a different monitor and cable for testing?
Does the system use a graphics card or is the graphics on the system board?
It might be worth trying a different graphics card (many people have old cards 
in their junk collection, so it shouldn't be hard to find one).


If only happening on Linux, setting up an xorg.conf file is rarely needed these days, but
it can be required.  Googling the brand and model of monitor can find others
who have figured out the parameters for xorg.conf already or one can try
running one of the configuration commands to generate an xorg.conf file to start with.



On Tue, Dec 18, 2018 at 3:55 PM Frank Geitzler <[hidden email]> wrote:
I have an old Proteva 32-bit system a friend gave me, which I use to
test old hardware.   It came with Win-XP Home on a WD1200JB IDE hard
drive, and I removed that drive and put it away some time ago.  I made a
number of changes to the BIOS attempting to get the system to recognize
an old SATA drive, and was interrupted and didn't get back to it for
quite a while.  When I did attempt to use it, the onboard battery was
dead, and when I installed a new one, I couldn't get the system to work
at all.  I had forgotten which BIOS values I had changed, so eventually
I selected the 'factory reset to original values' option.  I then put
the original hard drive back in, deciding I would return to the original
working computer.  I was able to boot into Win-XP, but apparently
Windows no longer realized that it had been returned to its original
computer, and wanted to be validated before running. I had the original
product key, and entered it, but the system then wanted to be connected
to the internet.  I did so, but the Microsoft validation system told me
I would have to call support. I have not had much satisfaction calling
Microsoft support in the past, so have not yet done so.

If memory serves, Win XP ties the validation to a particular hardware
configuration, so if you make a significant change to the hardware,
you had to call MS Support.  This created big headaches for people
developing custom hardware.   If you can restore the hardware to 
the last configuration used to run XP it may not ask for validation.

You can remove the component of Windows that does validation:
 

I decided to install Ubuntu (alongside the Windows), and was successful,
but when I attempt to do a restart (either from Ubuntu, or from Win-XP),
the system comes to a halt, and I always receive the following error
message:

             Out of timing

            V : 53 Hz        H : 56.8 kHz

Does this error mean anything to anyone at either club?

Knoppix can sometimes boot where other distros fail due to 
misbehaving hardware.

There is often useful information in the Xorg log, usually "/var/log/Xorg.0.log".
This should tell you what graphics hardware was found, which driver was selected, 
and which mode settings were chosen.
 

If I find out what the error message means (or perhaps even if I don't),
my next project will be to determine how I should change the BIOS
settings so that I can use a SATA drive.

Any suggestions for either problem would be appreciated.

Merry Christmas!

Frank Geitzler


--
George N. White III


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nSLUG mailing list
[hidden email]
http://nslug.ns.ca/mailman/listinfo/nslug